Janice has been editing and performing books since 1984. Each title is scripted into a fifty-minute monologue. Her repertoire incorporates works of humor, romance and current affairs, as well as journalist accounts of people and places. Janice dramatizes books to a variety of audiences, including book clubs, church groups, civic organizations, and entertainment venues.

Janice also provides oral book reviews. Contact Janice to inquire about speaking to your group.

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

The 2016 novel A Gentleman in Moscow is the story of Count Alexander Rostov. In 1922, the Count is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by the Bolsheviks, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, a thirty-two-year-old bachelor, must live in an attic room for decades during the most turbulent years of Russian history. Rostov later comments, “The Russians were the first to figure out how to exile someone in their own country, denying them a new beginning somewhere else.”

Political intrigue, espionage, and unexpected personal relationships make this story complex and unpredictable. While Communist party politics swirl around him, in and outside the hotel, Rostov learns to play the system to his own advantage. His first concern is finding a purpose for his life even in his restricted circumstance. At first, he believes that routine, civility, and practical concerns will suffice, but he soon learns otherwise.

Count Rostov makes friends with the hotel staff and many of the international guests. He gets a job as a maître d’ in the Metropol’s grand restaurant. Then, unexpectedly and improbably, he finds himself the guardian of a young girl abandoned in the hotel. As Rostov and Sophia wait for the return of Sophia’s mother, their lives and their futures change forever.


Jo Malone: My Story by Jo Malone

Jo Malone is globally recognized for revolutionizing the beauty industry. As one of the most inspirational entrepreneurs of our age, Jo is responsible for creating some of the world’s favorite fragrances. Yet, her personal journey to international brand prominence has not been easy. Now, for the first time, Jo tells her remarkable life story.

When asked where her spirit and drive to succeed came from, Jo replies, “I suppose it all started in my childhood.” From a very modest beginning in government housing and a struggle with dyslexia to her fight against breast cancer and the buy-out of her brand, Jo has emerged as one of the most likeable and well-respected personalities in British retail today.

This lively memoir explores how Jo’s unique talents grew out of an ability to interpret the world through an extraordinary sense of smell. Her honesty, courage and willingness to reveal the personal highs and lows of reinventing herself are an inspiration to us all.


My Name is Mahtob by Mahtob Mahmoody

MyNameIsMahtob

My Name is Mahtob, a daring escape, a life of fear, and the forgiveness that set me free, by Mahtob Mahmoody is the continuing story of a mother and daughter held hostage in Iran. Their dramatic escape and return to the United States in 1986 was told by Mahtob’s mother in her 1987 international bestselling book, Not Without My Daughter, and later in the movie by the same title, starring Sally Fields. Now Mahtob tells her own story of struggling to forgive her father even as he pursued her in America, fighting against the disease that threatened her life, and forging a life of her own.


I Kiss Your Hands Many Times: Hearts, Souls, and War in Hungary by Marianne Szegedy-Maszak

I Kiss Your Hands Many Times

In 2004 after the death of both of her parents, Marianne Szegedy-Maszak went to clear out her parent’s home in Washington, D.C. and discovered a new story line for her multigenerational, Hungarian family. Framed around a cache of letter written between 1940 and 1947, memorabilia and souvenirs from pre-war Hungary found in her childhood home, Marianne shares with readers the epic and intimate love story of her parents who overcame immense obstacles to marry in 1945 after Marianne’s Gentile father was released from Dachau and her Jewish mother returned from exile in Portugal.

Aladar Szegedy-Maszak was sent to the United States as the first Hungarian ambassador after the war, but within a year, the Soviet regime had taken over Hungary. Aladar resigned his post as ambassador and with his wife, Hanna Kornfeld, a baroness whose family once owned one-fourth of all the wealth in pre-war Hungary, defected and received asylum in the U.S. Marianne’s memoir tells the story of hearts, souls and war in Hungary, a world about which she knew very little and could never have imagined


The Little Girl who Fought the Great Depression: Shirley Temple and 1930s America by John Kasson

 

Shirley Temple and 1930sThe Little Girl Who Fought the Great Depression: Shirley Temple and 1930s America by John Kasson covers the fifteen years of Shirley Temple’s movie career, focusing on the years 1934 to 1940. It was said that Shirley could ‘smile like a Roosevelt,’ and because of the Great Depression, Shirley and FDR became accidental partners in bringing optimism, consumerism, and child labor reform to Americans.

After Shirley Temple left the film industry, her life was filled with children, charity work, and civil service. She was a part of ten presidential administrations in various capacities. Shirley Temple died at the age of 85 early in 2014, but her film legacy and political achievements live on.”


 Stealing the Mystic Lamb: The True Story of the World’s Most Coveted Masterpiece by Noah Charney

Jan van Eyck’s Ghent Altarpiece is on any art historian’s list of the ten most important paintings ever made. It is also the most frequently stolen artwork of all time. Since its completion in 1432, this twelve-panel oil painting has been looted in three different wars, burned, dismembered, forged, smuggled, censored, hidden, attacked by iconoclasts, hunted by the Nazis and Napoleon, used as a diplomatic tool, ransomed, rescued by Austrian double-agents, and stolen a total of thirteen times. In this fast-paced, real-life thriller, art historian Noah Charney unravels the fascinating stories of each of these thefts. Charney also explores psychological dramas that lurk within the history of art crime—and the ideological, religious, political, and social motivations that have led many men to covet this one masterpiece above all others.


Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen

 In this book, the author of Seven Gothic Tales gives a true account of her life on her plantation in Kenya. She tells with classic simplicity of the ways of the country and the natives: of the beauty of the Ngong Hills and coffee trees in blossom: of her guests, from the Prince of Wales to Knudsen, the old charcoal burner, who visited her: of primitive festivals: of big game that were her near neighbors–lions, rhinos, elephants, zebras, buffaloes–and of Lulu, the little gazelle who came to live with her, unbelievably ladylike and beautiful.


The Best Christmas Pageant Ever by Barbara Robinson

An outrageous family of six children take over the church’s Christmas pageant and help everyone discover the real meaning of Christmas in this hilarious first-person account from one of the church kids.


Hadassah by Mark Andrew Olsen

Based on the story of Queen Esther in the Old Testament, this Biblical fiction recounts Esther’s story in the form of a letter passed down to present day from the decedents of the original recipient.


Ruth, A Portrait by Patricia Cornwell

A biography of Mrs. Billy Graham, written from the unique perspective of her former protégée, crime novelist, Patricia Cornwall.


 Mark and Livy: The Love Story of Mark Twain and the Woman who Almost Tamed Him by Resa Willis

Olivia Langdon Clemens was not only the love of Mark Twain’s life and the mother of his children, she was also his editor, muse, critic and trusted advisor. She read his letters and speeches. He relied on her judgment on his writing, and readily admitted that she not only edited his work, but also edited his public persona. Until now, little has been known about Livy’s crucial place in Twain’s life. In Resa Willis’s affecting and fascinating biography, we meet a dignified, optimistic woman who married young, raised three sons and a daughter, endured myriad health problems and money woes and who faithfully traipsed all over the world with Twain – Africa, Europe, Asia-while battling his moodiness and her frailty. Twain adored her.


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